Rejections, Acceptances, and Other Things I’m Grateful For

 

 

The hardest thing about being a writer is not all the short story rejections, the pitch rejections, and even the agent rejections–I actually don’t mind all of that, because it’s all part of the writerly process.

It’s discovering all these amazing books to read (via the short story submission opportunities), and not enough money to purchase them!

(And I hate not having enough time to write, but this is supposed to be a kvetch-free blog post!)

So, thanks to all the people and publishing companies that are out there, providing plenty of opportunities for writers to write and submit, and even those who share submission opportunities via databases and email newsletters/online postings, like The Horror Tree and the Submission Grinder. And thanks for dedicating the time to read/review all the submissions, and for taking the time to write said rejection letters out of what must be a very busy schedule.

And, so, I also want to thank those who accepted/are accepting my stories and articles over the past several years (in no particular order): Renaissance Magazine, Catster, the Rio Grande Sun, Rock N’ Roll Horror Zine, Mad Scientist Journal, Speculative 66, Mt. Misery Press, David Higgins, Z Publishing House, Fantasia Divinity Magazine, EconoClash Review, Forty-Two Books, and Excalibur Books. I would also like to extend the thank-yous to the blogs where I guest blog at:Katzenworld blog, The Green Stars Project, and Madness Heart Press. (Also check out blogs I follow, which have supported me for…years, now!)

I’ve added all their links, above, so feel free to explore!

Apologies if I’ve overlooked anyone, and please post up in the comments or send me an email if I need to add you. I’m cramming in a week’s worth of work in the mornings before the day job, and any oversight was not intentional.

So, publishers, writers, fellow bloggers and blog readers, and everyone else in the writing community, I hope you’re having a wonderful Friday!

Keep the words, and the books, journals, and zines coming!

The Journey Back to Earth

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Whew, finally getting around to reviewing some books for #writingwednesday!

First up, Versions of the Self (poetry) by Christy Birmingham.

Linky links:

Amazon

Goodreads

Christy Birmingham’s When Women Inspire blog: https://whenwomeninspire.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/christybis

Review:

I’ve followed Christy Birmingham’s blog for years, and, likewise, she’s been a strong supporter of mine. I think she was one of, if not the first, who purchased my book of poetry when I self-published (Oh, Createspace, how I miss thee!). But this is the space for honest reviews, and, being an honest, ethical, straight-arrow type, with a healthy dose of blunt forthrightness, here goes my honest review. (Please, stick with me to the end of the review.)
I wasn’t sure how I felt about this book, the first time I read through it. I felt somewhat removed from the poems within, and I couldn’t understand why. As a woman, going through what seems a similar journey of self-transformation, why was I feeling unsettled? Why didn’t it grab me straight from the beginning?
It wasn’t until I sat down to write this review that I realised what was giving me this sense of disquiet. I spend a lot of time in other realms. The theme of my own poetry book is all about journeys to other worlds. Alternate dimensions, astral travel, tandem dreaming, visits to fairyland–however you want to classify it, it has very little to do with the “real” world. And my short stories reflect more of the same–fantastical, surreal, spooky, and a little escapist (or so I hope!). I spend so much time up here in my head, or a million miles from it, that I’m not very present. I constantly receive gentle instructions to become more grounded, to visualise coming down into my feet. But it’s not a place where I’m most comfortable. I want the deep vastness of space; of the ocean. Of anywhere but here on Earth.
Christy’s poems reflect exactly that sort of grounded earthiness I’m constantly trying to avoid. Being present, being in the moment. Being real, no matter how much it hurts. Or how confusing it is. From my way-out-there, interdimensional traveller perspective, I see her as a very present poet. And I’m also not used to reading that in poetry.
And it’s a necessary, and lovely, stability in the rareness of the feeling her poetry inspires. With each poem brings another block to lay on the foundation under my feet. As a woman, as a denizen of this planet no matter how much I dream myself otherwise, she connects me back to the Earth under my feet; to my own “Version of Self” that connects with lines of her poems.
“Gliding under Water” reminds me of the simplicity of being a young girl in a pool; a time where my sensory experiences were more immediate. Though her work is titled “Versions of the Self,” I see it more as a stripping away of those versions to achieve a strong core, bringing us along with her as she goes back to basics. To having strong roots. And water, ironically, also helps root the reader in a very real, relatable experience of loss and change, in her poem “Within a Few Feet”. We have no choice to be present right along with the poet, because her pain is ours. It’s a pain that, sadly, lies in most women, and maybe the human race in general.
Lastly, she reminds me that it’s okay to be down here, in the muck and mire that is Earth, to “start at the bottom” (from “Bottom of the Waterway”). Because it’s only from there that we will learn to fly.