Rejections, Acceptances, and Other Things I’m Grateful For

 

 

The hardest thing about being a writer is not all the short story rejections, the pitch rejections, and even the agent rejections–I actually don’t mind all of that, because it’s all part of the writerly process.

It’s discovering all these amazing books to read (via the short story submission opportunities), and not enough money to purchase them!

(And I hate not having enough time to write, but this is supposed to be a kvetch-free blog post!)

So, thanks to all the people and publishing companies that are out there, providing plenty of opportunities for writers to write and submit, and even those who share submission opportunities via databases and email newsletters/online postings, like The Horror Tree and the Submission Grinder. And thanks for dedicating the time to read/review all the submissions, and for taking the time to write said rejection letters out of what must be a very busy schedule.

And, so, I also want to thank those who accepted/are accepting my stories and articles over the past several years (in no particular order): Renaissance Magazine, Catster, the Rio Grande Sun, Rock N’ Roll Horror Zine, Mad Scientist Journal, Speculative 66, Mt. Misery Press, David Higgins, Z Publishing House, Fantasia Divinity Magazine, EconoClash Review, Forty-Two Books, and Excalibur Books. I would also like to extend the thank-yous to the blogs where I guest blog at:Katzenworld blog, The Green Stars Project, and Madness Heart Press. (Also check out blogs I follow, which have supported me for…years, now!)

I’ve added all their links, above, so feel free to explore!

Apologies if I’ve overlooked anyone, and please post up in the comments or send me an email if I need to add you. I’m cramming in a week’s worth of work in the mornings before the day job, and any oversight was not intentional.

So, publishers, writers, fellow bloggers and blog readers, and everyone else in the writing community, I hope you’re having a wonderful Friday!

Keep the words, and the books, journals, and zines coming!

Under a “Hunter’s Moon” with Philip Caputo

Book Review: Hunter’s Moon by Philip Caputo

Well, of course, I read his A Rumor of War in history graduate school. So, I was excited to receive a copy of Hunter’s Moon: A Novel in Stories in a giveaway hosted via Goodreads.

Not to stereotype, but I’m pretty sure I’m not Caputo’s target audience. A) I’m vegetarian B) If it were the zombie apocalypse, I’m pretty sure I would starve to death rather than hunt (and eat) one of my beloved animal friends.

But who knows what you would do in that scenario to survive? Maybe I’d be a pretty good hunter and gatherer. Which is why these stories surprised me, in much the same way as if I would become the Darryl (from Walking Dead fame) with his hunting acumen. But, even in my writerly let’s-get-a-story-from-them daydreams, I still can’t imagine shooting an animal.

Because of that, I wanted not to like this story collection.

I’m not even really a fan of general fiction. I’m a genre reader, pretty much these days.

So that’s at least two strikes. The third being that I’m getting more and more women-centric these days–way above and beyond my usual feminist beliefs. Men have had the limelight for long enough in this world.

But the writing won me over. The good old turn-of-the-phrase. Haunting, sparse, compelling me to read on.

And, because, as I’m entering into the confusing swamp of middle age, these stories all had a theme I could relate to.

I don’t know what to call it, really. A loneliness that feels like an old friend. A poignant seeking for something that will not be able to be resolved as long as we’re still sitting in the box called the human condition. A quality that reminds me of the kid that so wanted to be a child of the forest and the wild, instead of living among people, and yet was drawn indoors by the lure of sustenance, or the fear of punishment.

Of being alone, still, among all the other seven billion and counting people on this planet, taking up more and more space. And that it is, in fact, even more lonely for people like me.

It’s a transition that I haven’t come out the other side of yet. But the stories captured in Hunter’s Moon tell me that maybe I don’t have to know, yet. I can just sit with it a while, under the hunter’s moon, until the sun rises on the next part of my life. Or that the moon keeps an eternal watch on this, the end times (sans zombies).

(I received this book via a giveaway hosted by the book’s publisher/author via Goodreads.)